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2 weeks ago

Bee Hive Golden Years
Leo Boivin was born on August 2, 1931 [not 32 as some sources indicate] in Prescott, Ontario. He played 1150 games with 4 years in Toronto, 12 years in Boston, 2 years in Detroit, 2 years in Pittsburgh, and 2 years in Minnesota. Leo made his debut with Toronto on March 8, 1952 and earned an assist on Cal Gardner’s goal at 8:15 of the 1st period in a 6-3 win over Detroit at Maple Leaf Gardens. Leo played a big part of the Boston defense in the 50’s and 60’s, in the era between Eddie Shore and Bobby Orr. Leo played in 3 All-Star games and retired in 1970. Known was one of the hardest hitting defensemen of his era, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986. ... See MoreSee Less
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4 weeks ago

Bee Hive Golden Years
Before former NHL goaltender and current Pittsburgh Penguins General Manager Ron Hextall arrived to play in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania , grandfather and Hockey Hall of Famer Bryan Hextall (1913-1984) played the 1936-1937 season for the former American Hockey League team, Philadelphia Ramblers at the Philadelphia Arena at 46th Street and Market.In 49 games played for the Ramblers, Mr. Hextall scored 29 goals &23 assists in one season. He was called up to the New York Rangers (Ramblers affiliate) and was a member of the 1940 Stanley Cup Champions.[Note: this was one of several New York Rangers players presented by Bee Hive in a sweater of a team other than the NHL team.]scooped from a post by Felix Alicea to the Rink of Dreams page on Facebook. ... See MoreSee Less
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4 weeks ago

Bee Hive Golden Years
Red Dutton was born on July 23, 1897 in Russell, Manitoba. After his career in the WCHL and WHL, Red became a member of the Montreal Maroons and made his NHL debut on November 20, 1926 against the Montreal Canadiens. He made it to the Stanley Cup Finals twice with the Maroons, but he was traded to the New York Americans on May 14, 1930. After becoming player/coach for the 1935-36 season, a hip injury in the 1936 playoffs forced him to retire and become the full-time coach of the Americans. Red was behind the bench for 4 seasons, and also took over management of the team that was heavily in debt and facing bankruptcy. After the team became the Brooklyn Americans for the 1941-42 season, they finished last in the NHL and suspended operations for the 1942-43 season. After the sudden death of Frank Calder in 1943, Red Dutton served as president of the NHL until 1946. Red Dutton was later inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1958.scooped from a Kevin Foster post. BTW: I’d be grateful if anyone can decifer the signature of Norman Alexander Dutton (AKA Mervyn) on this Bee Hive picture…what initials did he use? ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Bee Hive Golden Years
It was on June 25, 1993 when the Hockey Hall of Fame announced their new inductees. The class of 1993 included Billy Smith, Steve Shutt, Guy Lapointe, and Edgar Laprade. In his first year in the NHL with the New York Rangers, Edgar Laprade scored 15 goals with 19 assists for 34 points and was awarded the 1946 Calder Memorial Trophy. The next season, Edgar improved to 40 points and played in the 1947 NHL All-Star Game. Edgar also appeared in the 1948, 1949, and 1950 NHL All-Star Games. Three times in Edgar’s career, he played the entire season without any penalty minutes and he was awarded the 1950 Lady Byng Memorial Trophy while recording one minor penalty for the season. Edgar played in 500 games over a 10-year career for the New York Rangers.another scoop of a Kevin Foster post. Thank you sir. ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Bee Hive Golden Years
Bill Cowley was born on June 12, 1912 in Bristol, Quebec. Bill entered the NHL as a rookie with the St. Louis Eagles in the 1934-35 season. Unable to meet financial obligations, the Eagles halted operations at the end of that season and the NHL dispersed the players among the remaining teams. Art Ross of the Bruins selected Bill Cowley in the dispersal draft, paying a fee of $2,250. With the Bruins, Bill Cowley was one of the great NHL playmakers, leading the league in assists in 1938-39, 1940-41, and 1942-43 and led the NHL in scoring in 1940-41. Bill helped the Bruins win the Stanley Cup in 1939, leading the NHL in playoff scoring with 14 points in 12 games, and won his second Stanley Cup in 1941. A winner of the Hart Trophy in 1941 and 1943, Bill retired after the 1946-47 season with 195 goals and 354 assists for 549 points in 549 games played and was the NHL’s all-time points leader, a record that he held until Elmer Lach surpassed it on February 23, 1952. Bill Cowley was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1968.another scoop from Kevin Foster (thank you sir).I read elsewhere that Cowley quit playing for Boston because Bruins manager Art Ross left him off a west coast post-season exhibition junket which Cowley was going to also use as a honeymoon. ... See MoreSee Less
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